Betsy Reed

Betsy Reed is the Editor-in-Chief of The Intercept. Previously, she was Executive Editor of The Nation, where she led the magazine’s award-winning investigative coverage. She has edited several best-selling books, including Jeremy Scahill’s “Blackwater” and “Dirty Wars.” Reed co-edited the New York Times best-seller “Going Rouge: Sarah Palin, An American Nightmare” with Richard Kim. She is also the editor of the essay collections “Unnatural Disaster: The Nation on Hurricane Katrina,” published on the storm’s one-year anniversary, and “Nothing Sacred: Women Respond to Religious Fundamentalism and Terror” published in 2003.

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WHAT SHOULD WE BE AFRAID OF?

Duncan Campbell talks about the landscape of contemporary surveillance and official secrecy in the UK, the US and beyond, with Ian Cobain and John Goetz. Chair: Betsy Reed.

 

SPIES LIKE US: THE RETURN OF THE ESPIONAGE ACT

The American authorities are increasingly resorting to The Espionage Act 1917 to prosecute journalists, and the British Government prepares its own Espionage Act which conflates journalists, whistleblowers and spies. As TV channels and NGO’s are asked to register as a “foreign agents” and Wikileaks is identified as a “hostile intelligence service”, we ask questions about the relationship between journalism and espionage. Are journalists still being used as spies and informants by intelligence agencies? How best can we best protect ourselves and those we work with against the allegation of spying?

Speakers: Anna Belkina, Stefania Maurizi, Gill Phillips, Paul Lashmar. Chair: Betsy Reed.