Qcumber Launch Event

    Tuesday 29 January 2013 - Wednesday 30 January 2013
    ELG19, Drysdale Building

    This is a free event but booking is required.

    The event starts at 6pm and will last for around two hours.

    We are pleased to invite you to the UK launch of Qcumber, an integrated network that informs citizens about the environmental conditions where they live and tells authorities about local problems.

    Qcumber has been developed by Joseph Magro from the University of Bologna and he will be presenting the software and explaining how it works and why it is important.

    About Qcumber
    Over the last few years social and media attention towards environmental issues has taken on a central role in the planning of social, political and technical policies all over the world.

    As the economic crisis hinders future growth, environmental sustainability has become a critical issue due to its close relationship with economic and social sustainability. Governments and other political authorities have a duty to explore and adopt strategies in order to deal with new problems. For example, this can be done by exploiting the power of communication technologies and the internet.

    Thanks to the growing use of the internet and the spread of easily accessible applications, it appears essential to establish a new relationship between citizens and institutions founded on public activism and collaboration. This is the path paved by Qcumber (www.q-cumber.org), whose main function consists in promoting environmental sustainability through collaboration between citizens, local authorities, monitoring bodies, and entrepreneurs.

    Qcumber is an integrated multifunctional network that informs citizens about the environmental impact conditions of the area where they live and tells authorities about local problems and needs thanks to a dynamic and interactive geo-database that is constantly updated by a Wiki 2.0 network of active citizens. Qcumber contains data and information from several official databases of impactive activities, also known as “stressors”. It measures and tracks on a Google Maps interface environmental and health risks within residential or rural areas.

    Qcumber features several types of tools, which produce impact and environmental risk maps: the software uses Environment Agency simulation models but the risk assessment results are put down in a simple way in order to let non-experts understand and have a voice in local policies.

    Qcumber users have their own MyQMap, which allows them to communicate with other users and share information and complaints or proposals for local authorities. In this way attention is raised over environmental questions on a collective and collaborative basis. Next year Qcumber will open in the UK. It will feature the same apps that have made it popular in countries such as Italy, where several institutions have adopted it in order to facilitate territorial management policies and to make decision-making processes more rational and participative.

    Summing up, Qcumber is an innovative mixture of social networking, environmental training and Wiki 2.0 based communication. Over the meeting we’ll go through:

    • Some cases where Qcumber managed to isolate and sort out environmental problems on a transparent and collaborative way.
    • Opportunities for UK citizens, institutions and other organisations within the field of environmental sustainability.
    • Collaboration opportunities in the UK and worldwide.

    Qcumber uses a dynamic and interactive geo-database that is constantly updated by a Wiki 2.0 network of active citizens.

    It contains data and information from official databases. It measures and tracks on a Google Maps interface the environmental and health risks within residential or rural areas.

    It features several types of tools, which produce impact and environmental risk maps: the software uses Environment Agency simulation models but the results are presented in a simple way so that non-experts can understand and have a voice in local policies.

    Qcumber users have their own MyQMap, which allows them to communicate with other users and share information and complaints or proposals for local authorities. In this way attention is raised over environmental questions on a collective and collaborative basis.

    Next year Qcumber will be available in the UK. It will feature the same apps that have made it popular in countries such as Italy, where several institutions have adopted it in order to facilitate territorial management policies and to make decision-making processes more rational and participative.

    The event starts at 6pm and will last around two hours. There will be a presentation and demonstration of the software and a chance to answer questions.

    This event is free but booking is required, please register your interest on the booking form.